Law Enforcement Torch Run makes its way into Clare

Basketballer Talia Batt, with the help of Clare's senior constable Mark Hill, lit the Cauldron at the ceremony, along with speeches and other entertainment.
Basketballer Talia Batt, with the help of Clare's senior constable Mark Hill, lit the Cauldron at the ceremony, along with speeches and other entertainment.

A hot, dry and dusty day greeted those taking part in the Law Enforcement Torch Run through Clare but this certainly didn’t stop the enthusiasm. 

In raising awareness of the Special Olympics National Games the Law Enforcement Torch made its way into Clare on Wednesday, April 11.

Held just five days out from the opening ceremony of the games to be held in Adelaide. 

Clare was the fifth of 12 runs over the eight-day Torch Run that sees Law Enforcement Officers and Special Olympic Athletes travel 1,400 KM across regional and metropolitan areas of South Australia.

Clare’s own Senior Constable Mark Hill took part in the relay and was joined by a number of officers and special games torch relay runners. 

South Australia Police senior constable Michael Klose said the Law Enforcement Torch Run had become an iconic part of the Special Olympics National Games.

“What started in Kansas in the 80s has now rolled out across the world. The police globally are the official guardians of the Flame of Hope and we couldn’t be prouder,” Mr Klose said. 

The Flame of Hope is a symbol, lighting the way for the athletes of the Special Olympics.

The police officers have become the Guardians of the Flame, an honourable and proud term, evident as they run side by side with the athletes across South Australia.

The Run departed Clare Oval at 1.15pm and took a tour through the streets of the town, eventually ending up at Ennis Park. 

Participants were met there by locals and the Clare NAB Branch – the presenting partner of the Special Olympics National Games. 

Basketballer Talia Batt, with the help of Mark Hill, lit the Cauldron at the ceremony, along with speeches and other entertainment.

Gregg Harris, NAB State General Manager South Australia, said that they were thrilled to be involved. 

“...we hope to raise awareness of inclusive communities and the importance of giving people the opportunity to reach their best, be it in sport or personal life,” Mr Harris said. 

The Special Olympics National Games will see 1000 athletes with intellectual disabilities compete across 11 sports from 16 to 20 April. For more visit: specialolympics.com.au/nationalgames2018

The cauldron is lit.

The cauldron is lit.