Premier launches battery at Jamestown

I want to express my gratitude to the workers who have constructed this battery - they have every right to be proud of what they've constructed

Premier Jay Weatherill

Premier Jay Weatherill was in Jamestown on Friday to officially unveil the lithium-ion battery at Hornsdale Windfarm.

The Premier unveiled a plaque at the launch of the lithium-ion battery.

The Premier unveiled a plaque at the launch of the lithium-ion battery.

Deputy CEO of Neoen Romain Desrousseaux joined the Premier at the launch, however representatives from Tesla were absent.

Clean and affordable wind energy can now be dispatched to the state’s power grid 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The Premier said the launch was “history in the making.”

“South Australia is now leading the world in dispatchable renewable energy, delivered to homes and businesses 24/7,” he said

“Neoen and Tesla approached the State Government with their bold plan to deliver this project, and they have met all of their commitments, ensuring South Australia has back up power this summer.

“I want to express my gratitude to the workers who have constructed this battery - they have every right to be proud of what they've constructed.”

Mr Desrousseaux thanked the state government on behalf of Neoen.

“We would like to acknowledge the efficiency, support and vision of the South Australian Government to bring the state to the forefront of global energy storage technology,” he said.

Testing began last week ahead of the launch on December 1, the first day of summer.

The Australian Energy Market Operator announced via Twitter that the battery charged up for the first time early in the morning on November 25.

Strong winds and heavy rainfall last Thursday forced the battery to enter the market a day ahead of schedule when 70 MW of stored wind energy entered the market.

The battery was completed 63 days after the signing of the interconnection agreement, meeting Elon Musk’s “100 days or its free” deadline.

However the battery was already well on track to meet the deadline by the time the agreement was signed on October 29.

Mr Musk revealed that the battery was already 50 percent complete at a special Powerpack event at the Hornsdale Windfarm later that night.

It was estimated that the battery would cost Mr Musk and Tesla upwards of $50 million if the deadline was not met.