Premier to launch battery next week

American energy storage company Tesla has finished installing its lithium-ion battery ahead of the December 1 deadline.
American energy storage company Tesla has finished installing its lithium-ion battery ahead of the December 1 deadline.

Jamestown’s lithium-ion battery has been fully installed at the Hornsdale Windfarm site and is set to enter the regulatory testing phase this week.

The testing phase will ensure that the battery meets AEMO and South Australian government requirements.

During this period, energy will be provided to system security services throughout the state by the battery.

Premier Jay Weatherill said SA was leading the way in renewable energy.

“While others are just talking, we are delivering our energy plan, making South Australia more self-sufficient, and providing back up power and more affordable energy for South Australians this summer,” the Premier said.

“The world’s largest lithium ion battery will be an important part of our energy mix, and it sends the clearest message that South Australia will be a leader in renewable energy with battery storage.

“An enormous amount of work has gone in to delivering this project in such a short time, and I look forward to visiting Jamestown next week to personally thank those who have worked on this project.”

Premier Weatherill will be in Jamestown next week to officially launch the battery alongside representatives from Tesla, Neoen and Consolidated Power Projects.

Tesla were awarded the contract back in July and on September 29 a special Powerpack event was held by the American energy storage company to mark the signing of the interconnection agreement.

The signing of the agreement triggered the “100 days or it is free” promise made by Elon Musk.

At the time of the Powerpack event the battery was already 50 percent complete with installation works already started at an earlier date.

Starting the installation early ensured that Tesla would meet its December 1 deadline, which was estimated to cost the company $50 million if it was failed to be met.