Drivers failing to slow down at crossing

Auburn Primary principal Catherine O'Dea with students Ryleigh Senar, Emily Linckers, Ben Miles and Flynn Ziersch at the school's zebra crossing on Port Road.

Auburn Primary principal Catherine O'Dea with students Ryleigh Senar, Emily Linckers, Ben Miles and Flynn Ziersch at the school's zebra crossing on Port Road.

Auburn Primary School has joined the growing list of local schools calling for drivers to slow down on roads around the campus.

Speed has been causing concern for home owners around the primary school on St Vincent Street and Port Road, with the latter deemed the worst for offenders coming off and going on to Balaklava Road.

It is the responsibility of the Clare and Gilbert Valleys Council to maintain St Vincent Street, while Port Road is the responsibility of the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure.

Auburn Primary principal Catherine O’Dea said she had contacted Clare and Gilbert Valleys Council with her concerns of speeding motorists, and had suggested ways of ensuring the students were safe when crossing the roads.

“We have asked council to update the signage so that the painting is fresh and people can see the zigzags on the road,” she said.

“We have also asked them about moving some of the signs so that the whole school is in a 25 kilometre/hour zone.”

Cars of all sizes have been reported speeding on Port Road, with trucks generally the worst offenders for failing to stick to the speed limit.

Mrs O’Dea said the main concern for Auburn Primary was the safety of its students, however she was also concerned for the well-being of motorists.

“Our concerns are for the safety of our children, and also for the motorists themselves because if they are not actually going 25km/h past the school, the likelihood of them being able to stop in time if a child is on the road is reduced,” she said.

“The higher the speed they are going, the less likely it is that they will be able to stop if their is a child in front of them.”

Mrs O’Dea said she had been in contact with a company called Way2Go, run by DPTI, about conducting a safety audit on the roads around the school.

“They look at the road around your school and then they do an audit for safety at pick-up times and drop-offs,” she said.

“They then do recommendations and work with the local councils and the state government to help rectify those things.

“We have just signed up for that program and have also signed up to do a bike safety education program starting next year.”

Mrs O’Dea had raised concerns about speeding drivers with local police and had seen officers on patrol in the area after it was brought to the attention of the Clare and Gilbert Valleys Road Safety Committee.

Clare Valley Police said they were aware of complaints of speeding in the area but would not make any further comment regarding the matter.

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